FACTS & FIGURES

Capital City

Capital City

Rome
Population

Population

60,551,416
Area Km2

Area, Km2

294,140
Language

Language

Italian
Area Code

Area Code

39
Currency

Currency

Euro (EUR)

VISA FREE

187

GDP PPP $

39,427

Time Zone

UTC +1:00

Dual Citizenship Italy

Allowed

Italian citizenship is regulated by Law no. 91 of 1992, recently amended by the Security and Immigration decree n. 113 - also named “Salvini decree” - in force since October 4, 2018.

Although the law governing citizenship in Italy is mainly based on the ius sanguinis principle, Italian citizenship can be acquired in a variety of ways.

The three most common routes are ancestry (“ius sanguinis”), marriage, and naturalisation.

Italian citizenship is acquired at birth, based upon the principle of “jure sanguinis” (by right of blood). Therefore, a child who is born to an Italian father or mother, is an Italian citizen, no matter where the child is born.

Spouses of Italian citizens may also acquire Italian citizenship through marriage or same sex civil union.

Citizenship by residency (naturalisation) is not easily obtained, as it is granted at the discretion of the public administration after showing evidence of ten years of legal residence in the country; knowledge of Italian language; and proof of sufficient   income produced in Italy.

Following the enactment of the law in 1992, Italian citizens acquiring a second citizenship do not lose their Italian citizenship, unless a formal request for renunciation is submitted. As of 2010, the Italian government has also adhered to the Strasbourg Convention and therefore allows Italian citizens to have dual citizenship. Italian law does not specify any consequences in relation to the registration or renunciation of the original citizenship. Italian nationals can hold dual citizenship without any special conditions.

Contributors